Appleville: The Apple Doesn’t Fall Far from the Tree

Distorted Appleville Graphic

Preceding the release of his second debut album “Apple” cohort and creator of PC Music singer, songwriter, producer, and creative director of Charli XCX Alexander Guy Cook hosted Appleville. A virtual livestream event with 25 performers on September 12th featuring 100 Gecs, Clairo, Charli XCX, and Dorian Electra. For the low price of seven pounds plus fees (so around twelve U.S. dollars), you could purchase a Golden Ticket. With your purchase you received access to the live zoom call where it will all go down known as the virtual mosh pit, select recordings from the concert (which were just uploaded to YouTube) and 32 bonus tracks on Bandcamp (which are free to stream). So basically nothing, BUT proceeds were going to charity, specifically Mermaids, a U.K. charity helping trans and gender diverse children and the Black Cultural Archives, “the only national heritage center dedicated to collecting, preserving, and celebrating the histories of African and Caribbean people in Britain.”

This isn’t PC Music's first live event, it is however their first virtual live event. In the past they have hosted Pop City and Pop Cube. This is also their first event without a PC acronym. Cook himself describes the show as "a tribute to live computer music in all its forms. A pastoral escape in the comfort of your own home, an infinite green field where you can sit back and watch some of your favorite musicians grapple with the limitations of time and space." So join me, as I recollect the events from that night. There were over 400+ visitors in the Zoom call with virtual backgrounds ranging from David Bowie to Brian Eno. My favorite usernames I saw were Pog and PISS BABY. I grabbed my apples and strapped into Zoom, ready to review.

Table of Contents

Felicita
Planet 1999
Danger Incorporated
Me & U2
BASECK
Fraxiom
Astra King
APPLEMOSH
Ö
Quiet Local
Aaron Cartier
Palmistry
Hannah Diamond
Jimmy Edgar
Alaska Reid
Oklou
Namasenda
Kero Kero Bonito
Amnesia Scanner
Clairo
100 Gecs
A. G. Cook
Charli XCX

Felicita's visuals of Felicita edited to have mismatched facial features

Felicita, edited with collage-like facial features.

Felicita

Best Visuals: Felicita

Felicita started the afternoon off with soothing and hypnotic tracks. The visuals right away were outstanding; we were met with a spinning snake of color and flashing strobe lights as felicita spun around in a separate video. The shot then switched from their phone recording to a front-on shot of felicita, phone in one hand, flowers in the other. They continued spinning and began to devour the flowers as a SOPHIE-esque track played. The sounds of felicita are so hard to explain, but so uniquely them. The first track almost made my ears itch with its hi-hats and statics over a low rumble of tones. Their visuals are what stood out most on top of the serene sounds. Felicita stood in front of a green flowery background with different eyes and a new mouth with a lip bite. As they moved their arms around, they soon became the background and could wipe it all around, messing up their fake facial features in the process. This second track was trance-like, reminding me of Iceland or those giant organs in old churches. Next up they played “陪你玩手機 (felicita Remix) (Facetime Love).” With airy sounds and cute handwritten subtitles, big time felicita fans loved the track. Their next track was mostly vocals asking strange questions, almost as if it was a conversation with someone while getting lost in a cave. It’s been two years since we’ve gotten a PC release from them, so I’m excited to hear what’s in store next!

Planet 1999

Planet 1999 followed with some starry visuals overlaying some type of beat sampler pack. The instrumental intro track featured all sorts of sounds from a weed-wacker to evil laughs to crashes to breathy synths. It slowly twisted, warping into itself as stars twinkled above. A robotic voice kept softly repeating “1999.” Although I've heard Planet 1999 isn’t a fan favorite of the PC Music crowd, I have always been pulled in to their dreamy lyrics and vocal glitches. Clouds wiped across the screen and Caroline, the lead singer, was in the sky like an angel singing the first lines: “For real I'm trying oh / For real I'm crying over you boo.” The spellbinding six-minute edit of “Night” was made up of a beat almost entirely made of vocal “U’s” and “O’s.” I was certainly taken aback as more and more layers, such as choppy vocals, hi hats, and a snare drum, came into the song. The repetitive beat was so enticing, listeners couldn’t help but to bop their heads along. Their iconic blue alien spun around the screen, pulsing to the beat. The sounds began to strip away as the window grew smaller and smaller. I’m excited to hear their second EP!

Danger Incorporated

Best Vibe: Danger Incorporated

Danger Incorporated had their set straight out of their recording room with a simple green screen draped up. The duo of Louie Duffelbags and Boothlord just released their sophomore album, titled Hackers of the World Unite, eight days before Appleville. Their first song of the night titled “Twilight” was inspired by the 2008 film (or the 2005 book if you’re a reader) of the same title, with lines like “Babygirl you could be Bella,” and “Team Jacob, oh, she touchin', tryna take my shirt off.” It reminded me of early PC music: satirical nonsense based around pop culture. Their voices and their attitudes were so contagious. Their second track, “WWYD + No Sweat,” was a double-hit, a two part song with catchy lines. One member joked, “Where’s the free apples?” and I chuckled munching on mine. No one told them it was BYOA, I guess.

Their third song was my favorite, synths overlayed a soft guitar. The opening line was so meaningful: “I’m feeling like the best mistake / Could you still love me?” Each line was sonically delivered perfectly, and I wish I had known the lyrics to sing along.

Their final song, “Lost Boy,” had lyrics and a sound which felt like the polar opposite of an old favorite PC remix of mine: K.I.D’s “Taker (EASYFUN Remix).” While the duo sang “Tell me what you’ve lost and I'll get it back” drearily and boldly, K.I.D’s sound was almost desperate, pleading with the persona who they put too much effort into. “Taker, taker, taker, taker, taker / When you gonna, gonna give a little?” The sound of “Lost Boy” is opposingly different from the EASYFUN remix as well. While Lost Boy has deep bass hits and a distinct reverberated underlying sound, “Taker” has booming, blaring loud drums and claps covering pitchy vocals. Another line that stuck with me was “I’ve been staying where you said it wasn’t safe / And I’m doing okay.” Their lyrics were often unexpectedly deep (or maybe I was just overthinking) — it was very enjoyable. I am definitely going to go give their album a listen!

Me & U2 Graphic

Me & U2 showing off their fun logo and social media.

Me & U2

Worst Visuals (in their defense, they had only been a band for like two weeks): Me & U2

If you haven’t heard of Me & U2, don't worry! I honestly hadn’t either, but their sound fits right into a post-PC world. Me & U2 is composed of four (possibly seven) members. The four member group came together during an event in A. G. Cook’s Apple Guild. In their song “Look Up,” they sang, “We have double the numbers of 100 gecs.” This song was my favorite of theirs because it was fast-paced and upbeat like a Gupi or Fraxiom track. Ending with a guitar over the autotuned singing was an exquisite touch. Their band was actually the winner of the Apple Guild’s Battle of the Bands only ten days before Appleville. Boy, were they lucky, out of over fourty bands, they got to play at the event itself! Their first song “thank u for coming” was playful but polished with simple lyrics such as, “‘Cause we make the best music here / Do you wanna bet?” Their sound was comparable to 100 gecs, yet softer and more youthful. Overall, it was a fun and exuberant set with wacky lyrics from the likes of, “All of this music was produced on an Xbox 360,” and “Hi baby, have you ever seen Flushed Away?”

BASECK

Most MIDIs: Baseck

Starting the set with absolute banger beats, experimental electronic producer Baseck knew exactly what he was doing during his Appleville set. Tapping and twisting on his Tempest Analog drum machine, he played songs reminiscent of his EP Energy Morph. Baseck was certainly the character: a man with super long hair that covered his face for the majority of the set as he danced around to the loud garage/alien-type beats. He had a wall lined head to toe with knobs and wires; someone in the chat joked about it being an episode of Storage Hunters. The sounds felt like super futuristic EDM and even reminded me of IDM. Listeners could hear the frequencies and feedback of the bass’s bangs and clangs.

Fraxiom

Most creative background visuals: Fraxiom

Fraxiom sang in a beautiful teal and pink dress in front of videos of cows to the iPhone release video with the Photo Booth hearts. Fraxiom started off “This Guitar” from their EP Feeling Cool and Normal, which came out the day after Appleville. Next, as they played an unreleased song, the chat blew up with “TERFS should die.” The best part was the instrumentals with a rising intonation of beats as Fraxiom yelled nonsense. They continued absolutely killing it, singing “scawy monstews and nice spwites :3, their Skrillex parody/cover. This song got everyone dancing around, and Fraxiom was full of energy, too. My favorite line was “When I get a check from streaming, I will use it on my queers.” The song was filled with Fraxiom’s favorite: lots of snare. Finally, they ended their set with an absolutely off-the-walls performance of “ride.” Fraxiom ended their stunning, lively performance with a cough into the mic.

Fraxiom with a Zoom-style background of the iPhone release video

Fraxiom absolutely killing it in front of St*ve J*bs.

Astra King

Top Performance: Astra King

Astra King only has five tracks out, but I desperately want her to release more. Known for her BTS covers of “Epiphany” and “Seesaw,” she truly is the queen of covers, adding her own eccentric spin on each and every one. Starting off her stream holding a flashlight to the screen, she sang. Her vocals created an absolutely euphoric sounding cover of Porter Robinson’s “Divinity.” I felt as if I was in the spotlight at a live concert, frozen in place because it chose to shine on me. The lights switched to blue and she continued to dance around until the flashlight ended up inside her mouth. She then continued with a unique cover of A.G. Cook’s “Silver” as she laid her head comfortably on a piano. It was unquestionably one of my favorite tracks of the afternoon — I’ve been listening nonstop since then. Her piano choices were absolutely stellar. For her next song, Astra played some autotuned guitar with a track with existential lyrics like, “Do you know if i am real?” Before the last song began, the date September 12, 1997 mysteriously flashed across the screen as she lay on the floor covered in microphone wires. She rapped the lyrics “Rapstar rockstar popstar superstar” as another date flashed onto the screen. This performance was for sure a must watch and must listen — you better get on that!

APPLEMOSH

At about the one hour mark, A. G Cook’s “Xxoplex” began to play and text like “YOU ARE INVADING THE STAGE YOU ARE MOSHING IN A CIRCLE YOU ARE IN A MOSH PIT MOSH ONLINE MOSH PIT” invaded the screen along with a video of a giant crowd at a festival.

A moshpit cam with clips of Baseck, felicita, Ö, and Dorian Electra head-banging and dancing around played. Then, real fans from the Zoom appeared on the screen! It felt straight out of Coachella (even though I doubt any of us would ever go to Coachella). I tried my hardest to stand out while synchronously writing content for this article. But, alas, I did not prevail on the screen for everyone to see. Afterwards, the text, “THANK YOU FOR MOSHING” ended the interlude.

Ö

Ö’s set began with a video of a young woman doing ballet alone in casual clothes over a beat. This set reminded me of the likes of Four Tet. I am a huge fan of Ö’s tracks — each one feels like it is transgressing you through a dream, reminding me what it feels like to be at peace. The unnamed dancer went perfectly with the music. Soon, the video began to purposefully lag and glitch along with the music. Clangs and haunting harps began to follow as the screen faded white. Glitchy chaos soon followed completely in sync with the techno splatter of a track. It felt like something straight out of a horror film.

Quiet Local

Quiet Local began with a simple guitar as the camera panned to a rugged bearded man singing under an apple tree. Taking me back to the early 2000s, the track felt like I had heard it before on a road trip in my early childhood. It felt a little bit like Nickleback and The Fray. It was a comforting break from the electronic mashing of noise. The camera had a soft radial blur, so it honestly felt like a dream sequence. His guitar had two cute flowers in a sunny yellow and rosy orange color at the end. During the second song, the camera would pan around the trees and the sky. During this set, I was so hungry I went and grabbed another apple — I wish I could have picked one right off the tree.

Aaron Cartier singing in front of Aaron Cartier Best Rapper .com

Aaron Cartier Best Rapper; This we cannot deny.

Aaron Cartier

Beginning his set with whisper rapping “aaroncartierbestrapper.com” and a track produced by Dylan Brady, Aaron Cartier’s sound was very unique. He sounded like 645AR mixed with 100 gecs, with original, almost childish samples. Footage of him dancing around in a storage unit played as live footage of him singing was in the bottom left corner. His sound was almost annoying, but the kind that would be stuck in your head for days to come. The first song was quite literally the same line about twenty times. His second track wasn’t really fire but had catchy lyrics following the lines of “I got the flame / I got the heat,” over and over again. He also played what he stated was an Appleville exclusive version of his new song, “Like Dis” featuring Caroline Lucent, Daydream Nathan, and Kent Osborne. Those names were all foreign to me, but they did have good solo parts in a song mostly made up of the like. Caroline sang angry rap that reminded me of Ashnikko and was my favorite part of his set. While he had amazing energy and quirky samples, he had my least favorite sound of the night. It was too repetitive, however, I did enjoy the shirtless men in the visuals for his final song.

Palmistry

Lowest High Quality Performance: Palmistry

Palmistry’s set began with a nice vape rip, something we all needed at this point. We were two hours in, but the Zoom opened an hour before, so this was hour three for me. Soft auto-tuned vocals floated over the piano for the first two songs. Palmistry has one of the sweetest and softest voices in PC Music right now. If I could describe it, I would do so as the voice you want your next boyfriend to have. I’d listen to anything he said as he sang, “In the end, it will all amount to nothing.” By the time he had gotten to his second song it was nighttime outside within the visuals, as it currently was outside my window. I felt as if I was watching the lofi study beats girl with his background setting.

I’ve heard others describe Palmistry’s sound as weak or unfinished, but I would never describe it as anything less than subdued and unrefined. The song was a lovelorn message to a lover just out of reach as he sang, “I was only fit for chemistry, was never fit for your love.” Barely any instrumentals carried his voice; it was so calming I could almost fall asleep. His voice was begging for harmony. The third track was so low quality it sounded as if it was a live recording of the track itself. I could barely make out the words, but I still wanted to dance around. At this point I could even hear the cameraman’s movement — I laughed. It quickly faded out and we were met with the kind words of who I speculate to be a preacher. He spoke over sounds of rain. “But have not love, I am nothing.” His last lines truly moved me: “Love and death are the great gifts that are passed on to us that most of us leave unopened.”

Dorian Electra performing behind a clipart silhouette of crowds of people

Dorian performing for their adoring M'Ladies.

Dorian Electra

Dorian Electra’s performance began with their own fingers setting up the camera and wiping it off in what I presumed to be their backyard. As loud low bass drums thumped, they slowly walked on screen to their mixer. The screen, held by comically shaky hands, zoomed into Electra singing one of their latest singles, “Gentleman.” Leading into their second latest track “M’Lady,” the visuals changed a bit with the only color remaining in their bright green hair. It felt as if they were one of the few that followed the unofficial theme of apples. The shadows of fake fans and bright green concert lights surrounded them; I thoroughly enjoyed their effort.

Next came a remix of “Sorry Bro (I Love You)” as Electra danced across the yard. They moved around as if they were in some sort of long-exposure photograph — trippy! After a boatload of remixes, they sat down and sang a slightly autotuned cover of the classic Beatles song “I’m So Tired.” A quick interlude followed the lines as Electra poked fun at the Apple corporation and their many copyright fiascos: “Apple is a company known to take copyright infringement very seriously.” Then U2’s “Vertigo” started to play, with Electra performing in the band’s silhouettes. (I know you know that band — they were on all our iPhone 6s back in 2014.) After the final track “Give Great Thanks (Count Baldor Remix),” Electra walked off screen leaving a lone sword up against a tree. I cannot wait to see what this era of Electra brings — every song they have released thus far has been a certified bop and a hilarious commentary on alt-right culture.

Hannah Diamond

Hannah Diamond began with a piano cover of “Heaven” by Bryan Adams. Her rendition was absolutely beautiful and would have been a great followup to Palmistry’s performance. The visuals showcased the fascinating editing process for the cover of her debut album, Reflections. I had honestly no idea what she was doing as black scribbles seemed to be scrubbing away marks from her skin. What followed was an acoustic-ish version of “Concrete Angel,” which, during the regular drop, was accompanied with the strums of a guitar. I appreciate this take which many other performers sought to create during this night. It was what you would call Pre-Computer Music. I’m sure it will be a few more years until we get another Diamond project, but I’m sure we can all enjoy Reflections until then.

Jimmy Edgar

A mystery curvy shape spun until the black background faded into a desert. A disc glided from the ceiling and Jimmy Edgar appeared in hologram form. Edgar began with sounds so slippery and wet they immediately reminded me of SOPHIE. Soon followed were beautiful chimes, xylophones, possibly alarms, and sounds I can’t even begin to explain over a trap-inspired beat that was bound to get listeners twisting. Clangs, twisted metal and warping plastic were even accompanied by female vocals as SOPHIE would do. If you don’t know who Jimmy Edgar is, I highly recommend you take a listen to his fourth and fifth album’s Moments of Reality and ZOOSPA for a full introduction to the unique producer. He has transformed old sounds with new in experimenting with field tapes, noise tracks, pitch bent tape loops, and tape splicing — sounds so foreign but familiar. I could visualize the kids I would never have doing dumb little dances to these beats. It truly felt like a trip to outer space or TikTok in 2050.

Alaska Reid

Alaska Reid has a beautiful natural voice, which made her performance stand out against all the autotune of the night. Her lyrics took me back as well. Sang so boldly, they felt like they were just hanging over water. Her first track “Oblivion” made me feel like I was floating in the clouds with a slight reverb stuck in my head. Her sound almost reminded me of Phoebe Bridgers’s lyrics with Fiona Apple’s voice. My favorite line of hers was “I’m in love with a ghost in the past,” which captures the ruined feeling of recognizing you are loving someone who’s anchored behind you. Her music made me want to run away to the countryside and start a new life. If you didn’t know Alaska is actually A. G. Cook’s girlfriend (sorry to break it to you, ladies and gays). Cook has previously been her mixing engineer and the co-writer of some of the songs she has put out. Each song stuck out from the next, with her soft voice guiding you through the lyrics. I’ll leave you with this line from her second track “Everglow:” “I got a headache and a heartbreak, feels like change.”

Alaska Reid Visuals that say Bad Bunny with a rabbit illustration

Alaska Ried showing off a graphic for her EP, Bad Bunny.

Oklou

I first found Oklou from her July COLORS performance in which she sang her song “fall.” Oklou, real name Marylou Mayniel (which is so beautiful I was confused as to why she even used a stage name), is a singer, songwriter, and producer originally from the equally beautiful city of Paris. Within the 2010s, she connected with Sega Bodega and coucou chloe and became a member of the London-based collective and label NUXXE. Oklou’s first song of the night was “nightime” and featured the lines, “But it's easy for them to say goodbye each time,” reminding me that people are temporary and to cherish them while you can.

Her vocals eased me as she sang softly from under a blanket in her room. It almost felt religious, as if I was being sung to by an angel. The visuals for her second song, “rosebud,” followed someone playing Metal Gear Solid 5, a game which I have never heard of, so I thank the chat for informing me. Her third song was an unreleased fan favorite, with the chat going absolutely wild! Sadly, this is probably the only song you won’t be able to hear from the performance as it was never re-uploaded onto YouTube like the rest of the performances. With lyrics like “Getting all wrapped up in you, HD real life,” I was hooked in too and truly cannot wait to see what captivating songs she brings to the scene next.

Namasenda

Namasenda is definitely the artist to watch closely in 2021. She’s the first Black artist to be signed to PC Music and originally from Sweden, a country known for its vast outflux of pop music superstars, songwriters, and producers. Since 2016, she has been releasing hyperpop and eurobeat bops. Her debut EP hot_babe_93 is a true classic in the realm of the genre. Namasenda began in black and white singing, “All up in my head, all up in my head” from an unreleased track. This track even got Dylan Brady talking. Her voice was absolutely lovely and she was able to hit every single note perfectly. Next, as she played “Dare,” she danced around which the chat called “adorable.” After, she followed with a hyperpop cover of “Love Don’t Change” by Jeremih, which got everyone else dancing with her. Next, she played “I Could Die,” which was released alongside Swedish Drain Gang record label Year0001. I can totally see her bringing us back to the roots of PC Music with her high-pitched vocals and repetitive lyrics.

Kero Kero Bonito

Second Favorite Performance: Kero Kero Bonito

Starting off strong with an absolute banger full of rocking guitar and drums, the group performed in sweatshirts, hoodies, and a silvery-shiny puffy snow jacket. Someone in the chat called them “the inventor of punk.” The first song they played was a lovely reinvention of the classic “Heartbeat” by Late of the Pier. Next came an alternative version of “Bugsnax” where singer Sarah Bonito simply read off the lyrics. I chuckled because I was ready to sing right along. After “Only Acting” came on, people went wild, but where the usual drop was, only Bonito sang along with a quiet, low quality recording of the drums. Everyone was as confused and stunned as I was. Afterwards, they played an instrumental version of “When The Fire Comes.” Bonito appeared as if she was actually singing, but they had muted her mic. It was hilarious! Their next song “You Know How It Is” came complete with a guitar solo. Their performance felt the most raw and concert-like, honestly. During the final song, the band started acting strange. It appeared as if the music began playing itself. Gus put his hands up showcasing his innocence, Sarah began painting, and Jamie started reading a book upside down. Finally, they all got up and walked away. A completely captivating beat continued to play, making me want to dance as Bonito sang, “And we will be well rested when ascension comes,” until it abruptly cut off. It was one of the best performances of the night — I would’ve totally appreciated an encore.

Amnesia Scanner

Weirdest Visuals: Amnesia Scanner

Amnesia Scanner took the cake for the weirdest visuals…by far. A human-like machine mouth with only a nose, cheeks, and flaccid eyes was filmed vertically. It truly matched their exciting album visuals. They always utilize bright colors and strange distorted images superimposed atop one another. The duo is originally from Finland and their sound has been described as “avant-EDM.” I truly recommended giving their first two albums Another Life and Tearless a listen if you like chaos and noise. Their performance began with the robot speaking lines of the mindless, “I can feel God's face when I’m with you,” and “The robin on the steeple / Is singing to the people / About their fear of being left alone.” The first song which played was “AS Trouble.” People in the chat began joking that this was actually Clairo’s performance. The second song they played was “AS Flat” featuring Code Orange. This song had clear rock influence and reminded me of the band HEALTH. Back again was the strange voice, which you may recognize if you have heard their music before. The final song they played was “AS Labyrinth.” I can’t wait for this team’s next project; they never fail to excite.

Amnesia Scanner's visuals of a human-like machine mouth with a nose, cheeks, and  eyes

Amnesia Scanner's strange machine-human hybrid face.

Clairo

Clairo was like an angel down from heaven. She had a few blonde streaks in her hair and an acoustic guitar on her lap. She played a few unreleased songs as the chat continued to joke around. She posted on Instagram about the tracks stating in a caption, “two new songs, no idea when these will see the light of day but I thought I’d share a couple of things I’m working on now.” While I’m sure she was the reason a majority of people were there, her performance did not give me as much excitement as any of the other acoustic performances. I absolutely adore Clairo and will be in the front row at her next tour, but maybe hyperpop just is not her scene. If she wants to collaborate with Danny L Harle again, I will totally listen.

100 Gecs

Third Favorite Performance: 100 Gecs

Absolute chaos of sound began with the intro scene from the classic movie, Ratatouille. Remy the rat began speaking: “This is me, I think it's apparent I need to rethink my life a bit, What's my problem? First of all, I’m a rat.” As the camera backed away, the visuals glitched alongside absolute banger beats. The loudest, most blaring bass played, and I loved every second of it. Laura Les, with her long blonde and medical mask, held up the computer playing Ratatouille. It didn’t matter how dirty the screen was with all the fingerprints, the music was amazing. The camera backed away and we could see Les in a long sleeve t-shirt dress. Soon, another unfamiliar voice interrupted before the second song started, “iTunes link below, earnings go to Diana and Gregory and Apple.”

The second song was a certified bop and Laura laid down next to a pile of trash. The lyrics “He said he liked the way I move / wooooah ohh wooooah ohh / Said he loves me too / wooooah ohh” were rapped out. Their songs are always so random, but somehow completely relatable at the same time. I will never understand how they do it.

The next song was a sort of mashup remix of “It’s Tricky” by RUN DMC and “War Pigs” by Black Sabbath. What I loved by this track was the absolute silence that was left between the distortedly loud beats. Laura handed off the computer to Dylan so he could hold it as the next song played.

The following song was another amazing remix with glitched out sounds that could not be explained in English, this one of “Blinded By The Light” by Manfred Mann’s Earth Band. The band was actually a one-hit wonder from 1976, which, for some reason, perfectly fits the vibe of 100 gecs. During this song, we began to move Dylan (who was standing VERY awkwardly, might I add) carrying the computer through a dark room which was only lit by the computer he was holding. This song had bars like, “I can't hold a tune but I'm trying” and even a Tony Velour feature. Each song flowed perfectly into the next. Their final song began with “If a rat—in a hat—could cook—real good” The lyrics felt absolutely pointless to be in a song but it went on as Dylan sang about Remy the rat and how they would love a cake. The performance ended with a strange recorded laugh (as it should).

100 Gecs's visuals of a dirty laptop playing the movie Ratatouille

100 Gecs's Ratatouille view party where they happened to play some music too.

A. G. Cook

Most A. G. Cook: A. G. Cook

Lo and behold, the star of the night, A. G. Cook. He started his performance off filmed out of focus, in a sort of radial blur, as he sang an acoustic version “Oh Yeah.” In the end it faded into the Cook we all know and love: pitchy-electro and classic. The visuals turned to neon green and purple. It felt like I was getting a live performance from Mr. Beatle (all the Beatles combined into one person). Cook is a very talented guitar player and I was taken aback by his skills as an instrumentalist, as I’m sure we all were with the release of 7G.

As a headless man walked up to a giant green apple, a familiar song began to play. It was a cover of “Today is the Greatest” by The Smashing Pumpkins. Oh, and that headless man? It put the apple on its head and, well, now it was Cook. The apple was A. G. Cook. No words. The song continued with voice cracks and visuals. The vocals were very faded and the performance felt very grunge and earthy. It was a very weird reimagination of a song I would not expect to get a PC version of (although Cook has remade songs by everyone from The Strokes, Blur, and Taylor Swift). Honestly, for being responsible for hyperpop, his performance was not very hyperpop. Here’s to hoping he never reads this article.

Charli XCX

Longest Song: Charli XCX

Charli XCX was yet another set to begin with a piano solo. What made hers special was the ten lit candles atop. She began to sing an acoustic-ish version of “Visions” (similar to what Hannah Diamond did), until it took a gamer/8-bit/piano turn. At around the two minute mark, she began spinning around in a room full of keyboards and she was lit by rainbow lighting. Then came those ever so bursting beats at the end of “Visions” combined with some unheard ones as Charli swam underwater with a spotlight on her. Soon, she was topless in a beautiful orange lingerie set and the chat was spammed with “GAY RIGHTS” and “TRANS RIGHTS.” The entire video of the Charli XCX set began to play again at hyperspeed in reverse as the piano played us out. Her entire set was an eight minute remix of “Visions” and I’m not complaining — it was an amazing way to end the night. I sat staring at my computer for a few minutes after the Zoom call had ended, left speechless in absolute awe.

As a headless man walked up to a giant green apple, a familiar song began to play. It was a cover of “Today is the Greatest” by The Smashing Pumpkins. Oh, and that headless man? It put the apple on its head and, well, now it was Cook. The apple was A. G. Cook. No words. The song continued with voice cracks and visuals. The vocals were very faded and the performance felt very grunge and earthy. It was a very weird reimagination of a song I would not expect to get a PC version of (although Cook has remade songs by everyone from The Strokes, Blur, and Taylor Swift). Honestly, for being responsible for hyperpop, his performance was not very hyperpop. Here’s to hoping he never reads this article.

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